Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: HIV nondisclosure and harm to sexual partners predict social evaluations and HIV stigma: Moral outrage and threat to self/others as mediators.

This study examined how HIV Nondisclosure/Disclosure and Harm/No Harm to sexual partners influenced, via moral outrage and perceived threat to self and others posed by the seropositive person’s behavior, liking and trust for an HIV-positive person, sti…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Self-stigma and empowerment as mediating mechanisms between ingroup perceptions and recovery among people with mental illness.

Positive ingroup perceptions have been recognized as a protective factor that enhances stigma resistance and improves the well-being of people from minority communities. However, the impact of positive ingroup perceptions on mental health recovery has rarely been explored. The present study proposed an ingroup perceptions model of recovery and examined how group value, group identification, and sense of community contribute to better clinical and personal recovery for people with mental illness through the mediation of self-stigma and empowerment. There were 258 people with mental illness completed a self-report questionnaire. Results of structural equation modeling revealed that the proposed model fit the data well, χ2(255) = 515.36, p

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Development and preliminary psychometric evaluation of a patient-reported outcome measure for lung cancer stigma: The Lung Cancer Stigma Inventory (LCSI).

Among patients with lung cancer, stigma is associated with negative psychosocial and behavioral outcomes. There is a need to develop psychometrically robust patient-reported outcome measures for stigma that incorporate perspectives of patients diagnosed with lung cancer. As part of our multiphase process of measure development and validation, we report on scale formation and preliminary psychometric evaluation of the Lung Cancer Stigma Inventory (LCSI). Building on previously reported concept elicitation (Phase I) work, Phase II of LCSI development involved item generation and refinement, informed by literature review, provider input, and patient (N = 20) feedback. Phase III focused on initial psychometric scale evaluation in a unique sample of 231 lung cancer patients. Based on provider input and patient cognitive interviews, 49 items were included in a preliminary measure. In an exploratory factor analysis of the 37 retained items, 3 factors emerged: perceived stigma, internalized stigma, and constrained disclosure. Internal consistency of the final, 25-item LCSI scale was high (Cronbach’s α = .89), and the 3 subscales demonstrated good internal consistency. The test–retest correlation was high (r = .91), suggesting strong stability of measurement over time. There was good convergent validity between the LCSI and an existing measure of lung cancer stigma, the Cataldo Lung Cancer Stigma Scale (r = .58, p

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