Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Community intervention to prevent adolescent health behavior problems: Evaluation of communities that care in Australia.

Objective: A major challenge for health psychologists is to ensure the implementation of evidence-based interventions to improve population health. To reduce high rates of adolescent alcohol use and related health problems, trials of the Communities Th…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: The modifying effects of social support on psychological outcomes in patients with heart failure.

Objective: We examined the modifying effects of social support on depressive symptoms and health-related quality of life (QoL) in patients receiving coping skills training (CST). Method: We considered the modifying effects of social support in the Coping Effectively with Heart Failure clinical trial, which randomized 179 heart failure (HF) patients to either 4 months of CST or usual care enhanced by HF education (HFE). CST involved training in specific coping techniques, whereas HFE involved education about HF self-management. Social support was assessed by the Enhancing Recovery in Coronary Heart Disease (ENRICHD) Social Support Inventory, QoL was assessed with the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ), and depression was assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Results: Linear regression models revealed a significant Intervention Group × Baseline Social Support interaction for change in KCCQ total scores (p = .006) and BDI-II scores (p

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Motor fluctuations and psychological distress in Parkinson’s disease.

Objectives: Off periods in Parkinson’s disease are associated with a worsening of nonmotor symptoms and acute psychological distress. The relationship between motor fluctuations and episodic distress in naturalistic settings remains unclear, particularly the role of individual psychological factors. This study aimed to identify those factors through real-life, real-time assessment using ecological momentary assessment (EMA). Method: Twenty participants (seven female) completed multiple brief prompted surveys over a 7-day period assessing current motor and medication state, social situation, episodic distress, and cognitive processes (rumination, symptom focus, and worry). Baseline depression and anxiety were measured using validated questionnaires, as were positive and negative beliefs and attitudes (metacognitions) regarding cognitive processes. The feasibility of EMA via smartphones was assessed at the end of the study. Results: Across participants, 496 complete data sets were collected. Generalized linear mixed-model regression analyses showed that episodic distress was predicted by a combination of cognitive processes, F(1, 483) = 41.14, p F(3, 483) = 10.40, p F(1, 23) = 12.42, p = .002, and trait negative metacognitions, F(1, 6) = 7.21, p = .037). EMA was judged acceptable by the majority of participants. Conclusions: Time of day, cognitive processes, and negative metacognitions predict episodic distress independent of motor state. This indicates potential targets for nonpharmacological interventions aimed at alleviating episodic distress in patients with motor fluctuations. EMA is a feasible methodology for Parkinson’s disease research and potential tool for delivering such interventions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Effects of syndemic psychiatric diagnoses on health indicators in men who have sex with men.

Objective: Syndemic theory posits that co-occurring problems (e.g., substance use, depression, and trauma) synergistically increase HIV risk in men who have sex with men (MSM). However, most investigations have assessed these problems additively using self-report. Method: In a sample of HIV-negative MSM with trauma histories (n = 290), we test bivariate relationships between four clinical diagnoses (substance use disorder [SUD]); major depressive disorder [MDD], posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD], and anxiety disorders) and their additive and interactive effects on three health indicators (i.e., high-risk sex, visiting the emergency room [ER], and sexually transmitted infections [STIs]). Results: We found significant bivariate relationships between SUD and MDD (χ² = 4.85, p = .028) and between PTSD and MDD (χ² = 35.38, p = .028, p p = .056). Number of diagnoses were associated with episodes of high-risk sex (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.14, 95% CI [1.03, 1.26], p = .009) and visiting the ER (odds ratio = 1.27; 95% CI [1.01, 1.60], p = .040) but not with STIs. No interactions were found between diagnoses and health-related indicators. Conclusions: This is the first study to demonstrate additive effects of clinical diagnoses on risk behavior and health care utilization among MSM with developmental trauma histories. Results indicate the need to prioritize empirically supported treatments for SUD and MDD, in addition to trauma treatment, for this population. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Promoting physical activity among cancer survivors: Meta-analysis and meta-CART analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Objective: We conducted a meta-analysis of physical activity interventions among cancer survivors to (a) quantify the magnitude of intervention effects on physical activity and (b) determine what combination of intervention strategies maximizes behavio…

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